Scott Allen Kleeschulte – Endangered Missing – St. Charles, Missouri

Scott Allen KleeschulteScott Allen Kleeschulte

AGE: 34
SEX: Male

RACE: White

HAIR:  Brown

EYES: Blue

HEIGHT: 4’4”

WEIGHT: 60 lbs
MARKS / SCARS:  Freckles across nose, 3 small moles on face, small scar on chin

 

Scott was last seen around 4:30 p.m. walking down  Ken Drive toward West Adams.  

 

MISSING SINCE: June 8, 1988
MISSING FROM: St. Charles, Missouri

 

CONTACT:
St. Charles Police Department 314-949-3300

CRIME STOPPERS 636-949-3333

NCMEC 1-800-THE-LOST

 

SCOTT KLEESCHULTE, NAMUS

 

http://www.missingkids.com/poster/NCMC/709798/1

 

 

Florida inmate claims to know what happened to missing St. Charles boy

August 07, 2013 12:15 am  

 

ST. CHARLES • A Florida inmate says he knows what happened to 9-year-old Scott Kleeschulte, who disappeared from a quiet St. Charles subdivision 25 years ago, and local authorities have spent the past seven weeks trying to figure out if he’s telling the truth.

Chuck Miceli, 47, is a former police officer from the Chicago area, who authorities say has turned informant on several other cases. He was sentenced to 20 years in prison in 2010 on a federal fraud charge, and he’s spent the majority of the time since then in prison in Florida.

Miceli came to the attention of local authorities after he claimed that a former cellmate is the man who abducted Scott on June 8, 1988.

Miceli’s local attorney, Kevin Curran, declined to make his client available for an interview. But in a letter Miceli mailed to the Post-Dispatch, he gave an overview of his claims, saying that his purpose for contacting the media was to ensure “absolute transparency” in the investigation.

Miceli said he was brought to the St. Charles County Jail by U.S. Marshals on June 17. He claims to have written documentation of the details not only involving Scott’s disappearance, but 13 to 15 other abductions and killings of young children and women between 1978 and 2005 by the same man.

St. Charles County Prosecutor Tim Lohmar said the investigation into Miceli’s claims is ongoing.

“At this point, Mr. Miceli has not provided any information that has led to the discovery of new evidence or new information regarding the disappearance of Scott Kleeschulte,” he said. “We’ll continue to thoroughly investigate additional information the same way we do with each and every lead.”

Scott was last seen not far from his home in the 3300 block of Leverenz Drive, walking near a wooded area known as “the Trails.” It was just before a fierce thunderstorm swept through the area.

As long as six weeks after his disappearance, police conducted large-scale searches of the area near Scott’s home. The searches involved digging at a labyrinth of caves in the wooded hillside where Scott was known to play with other neighborhood children.

Bloodhounds, sophisticated ultrasound equipment, helicopters and volunteers were used to scour creeks and sewers.

Tips on the case have come in steadily over the years, the last significant one in November 2011,  after St. Charles police gave the case a fresh review. They reinterviewed neighbors and came across new details.

Detectives got a search warrant for a home near Scott’s. They brought out cadaver dogs and drilled holes through the concrete in the garage and other areas around the home. But they came up empty.

The Kleeschulte family declined to comment on the latest investigation.

 

http://www.stltoday.com/news/local/stcharles/florida-inmate-claims-to-know-what-happened-to-missing-st/article_127968b1-c9f7-561f-b1fb-d4ebd5ee64f6.html

 

 

 

Parents of Boy Missing 23 Years Hope for New Leads

Feb 3, 2011 – 5:40 PM

 

For 23 years, the family of a missing Missouri boy has been trying to find out what happened to him. Searches have turned up nothing, leads have dried up and suspects have been ruled out. But renewed media interest in the case has revived hope that they might soon have some answers.

Nine-year-old Scott Allen Kleeschulte was last seen in St. Charles, a city located about 25 miles northwest of St. Louis, on June 8, 1988.

 

The day started out like any other, according to Scott’s sister, Tammy Kleeschulte. Scott got on the bus that morning and rode it to Coverdell Elementary School. It was the last day of the school year, and Scott was looking forward to spending long afternoons riding his bike and exploring the woods.

Scott took the bus home from school at about 3:30 p.m. that Wednesday. A thunderstorm was slowly rolling in overhead, but that did little to thwart Scott’s plans to play outside. He ran out of his Leverenz Drive home and headed down the street in search of adventure.

“He was playing, [and] he was right up the road on Ken Drive,” Tammy Kleeschulte told AOL News. “The storm was at 4:30 or 5 that afternoon. He was outside playing when the storm hit.”

Scott’s older sister, Stacy, is believed to be the last person to have seen the boy. She was headed to work when she saw him playing on West Adams Street, near Ken Drive. Where he went after that remains a mystery.

“He was here one minute and gone the next,” Tammy Kleeschulte said.

Scott’s parents, Peggy and Richard, arrived home from work a short time later. They had made plans to purchase a pair of shoes for Scott and take the children out to dinner to celebrate the last day of school. Their festive mood was short-lived. The family became worried when Scott failed to return home. After going door to door and checking his usual haunts, they contacted police.

 

At about 8 p.m., the St. Charles Police Department launched a full-scale for the missing boy. Officers on foot and horseback combed the area for clues while a helicopter conducted an aerial search.

There were initial concerns over rising water and flooding, so authorities searched local streams and waterways, but found no sign of the missing boy. Bloodhounds reportedly tracked Scott’s scent roughly five miles northeast on Fox Hill Road, but they discovered nothing.

Residents were on edge and scared about their own children’s safety.

“It’s to the point where you’re afraid to let your kids go out,” neighbor Pam Kreutz said in a June 15, 1988, interview with the St. Louis Post-Dispatch. “It’s a mystery. I just want to know [what happened to Scott] one way or the other. It’s always worse not knowing.”

By the following month, hope for Scott’s safe return was beginning to fade, and everyone, including local law enforcement officials, was stumped. Even the offer of a $10,000 reward had failed to turn up leads in the boy’s disappearance.

“I can’t remember ever dealing with anything equally baffling,” former Police Chief Patrick McCarrick said in a July 1988 interview with the Post-Dispatch. ”There are no developments in the case at all.”

And so the case went cold. Over the years, tips occasionally came in. Each one was meticulously investigated, but none provided any new information about the case.

In a bid to develop new leads, in April 1993 — nearly five years after Scott vanished — investigators prepared a computer-generated image of what they thought the missing boy would look like at age 14. The photo was later featured on the “Have You Seen Me?” cards distributed by direct-mail advertiser Advo. The cards became popular in 1985, when the company first featured 8-year-old Cherrie Mahan,  a Pennsylvania girl who disappeared under similar circumstances.

Appearing with police at a news conference announcing the creation of the photo, Richard Kleeschulte said he was still trying to cope with the loss of his son.

“It’s very hard. It sounds silly, but since this happened, I never sleep through a whole night,” he said, according to the Post-Dispatch.

A tearful Peggy Kleeschulte also described her pain.

“What’s the roughest is not knowing. Even if he’s no longer with us, it’ll be off our mind. We’d put him to rest. We’d go on with our lives.”

Nothing ever came of the direct mailings. Roughly 13 years passed before a chilling abduction raised the suspicions of everyone involved in the Kleeschulte case.

In January 2007, authorities acting on a tip raided the Kirkwood, Mo., home of pizzeria manager Michael J. Devlin. Inside, police found two missing children: Shawn Hornbeck and Ben Ownby.

Shawn was 11 years old in 2002 when he was kidnapped while riding his bicycle near his Richwoods, Mo., home. Devlin had kidnapped 13-year-old Ben just four days before the police raid.

The fact that Devlin’s home was located a mere 19 miles south of St. Charles did not escape the attention of the investigators, and Devlin, 41, could still be considered a suspect.

A multijurisdictional task force was quickly formed. It was made up of about 40 law enforcement officers from the FBI, the Franklin County Sheriff’s Department, the Missouri Highway Patrol, the Kirkwood Police Department, the Saint Charles Police Department and sheriff’s offices in Washington, St. Charles, St. Louis and Lincoln counties.

The task force began investigating Devlin for possible involvement in Scott’s disappearance, as well as several other unsolved cases in Missouri and one in Illinois dating back to the late 1980s:

Jacob Wetterling: On Oct. 22, 1989, the 11-year-old was riding his bicycle with his brother and a friend in St. Joseph when he was abducted by an armed man. The case remains unsolved.

Charles “Arlin” Henderson: The 11-year-old boy was riding his bicycle in Moscow Mills, Mo., on July 25, 1991, when he disappeared. Roughly three months later, his bike was found in a farmer’s field. Authorities have never been able to identify a set of fingerprints found on the bike. Charles’ whereabouts are still unknown.

Angie Marie Housman: On Nov. 18, 1993, 9-year-old Angie was abducted while walking near her St. Ann home. Nine days after her disappearance, two hunters in St. Charles County found her partially naked body duct-taped to a tree. The little girl had been sexually assaulted. Authorities suspect she was alive when she was left tied to the tree and that she ultimately died of exposure. Angie’s slaying is still unsolved.

Dalton Mesarchik: The 7-year-old boy was abducted from the front lawn of his Streator, Ill., home on March 26, 2003. Dalton was found dead the following day on the banks of the Vermilion River. Illinois State Police interviewed dozens of people and followed up on hundreds of leads but have been unable to identify the killer.

Bianca Noel Piper: Bianca, 13, was last seen walking near her home on McIntosh Hill Road in Foley, Mo., on March 10, 2005. The teenager never made it home and has not been seen since.

Despite their best efforts, members of the task force were unable to find concrete evidence linking Devlin to any of the cases.

“They followed up on a lot of circumstantial evidence and coincidences, but we have no physical evidence or witnesses at this point,” Sgt. Al Nothum of the Missouri State Highway Patrol, spokesman for the group, said in a July 2007 interview with the Missourian.

Speaking with the same newspaper, Devlin’s attorney said his client was not involved in the cases.

“His involvement in any other abductions or missing child cases is just nonexistent,” said defense attorney Ethan Corlija. “Mr. Devlin is simply not involved.”

Devlin ultimately confessed to his crimes involving Shawn Hornbeck and Ben Ownby and was sentenced to three life sentences for kidnapping, child molestation and production of child pornography.

“No, he is not a suspect. Not at this time,” Saint Charles Police Sgt. Gary Drury told AOL News today.

A former attorney for Devlin, Mike Kielty, recently told HLN that his client agreed to take a lie detector test regarding Scott’s case. According to the attorney, Devlin took the test and passed.

Drury said his department has yet to link Scott’s disappearance to any of the other ones the task force investigated. He said tips still come in from time to time, but none has resulted in any solid leads.

“We’re still looking for [Scott], and it is still an ongoing investigation,” Drury said.

Despite the lack of leads in the case, HLN’s Nancy Grace will be covering Scott’s disappearance on her new show, “Nancy Grace: America’s Missing.” The show debuted last month and has a goal of “finding 50 people in 50 days.” The episode featuring Scott will air next week.

“This is a real chance to go back and pick up those pieces and put them back together again,” Grace said in a recent interview with CNN.

Meanwhile, Scott’s parents still live in the house where they resided when their son disappeared. The family is hopeful that renewed interest will result in new leads and, ultimately, closure.

Tammy Kleeschulte does not want her brother forgotten. She was young herself when he disappeared, and said she has trouble remembering her sibling.

“I was really little at the time. I don’t really remember,” she said. “I just remember what people have told me.”

2011 AOL Inc. All Rights Reserved.

 

http://www.aolnews.com/2011/02/03/parents-of-scott-kleeschulte-hope-for-new-leads-23-years-after-d/

 

 

NANCY GRACE

Scott Kleeschulte Missing for 24 Years

Aired February 10, 2011 – 21:00:00   ET

THIS IS A RUSH TRANSCRIPT. THIS COPY MAY NOT BE IN ITS FINAL FORM AND MAY BE UPDATED.


(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

NANCY GRACE, HOST: Vanished into thin air.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Look for her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We just need to find her.

GRACE: So many cases.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: We`re still looking.

GRACE: So few leads.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Missing.

GRACE: Missing person.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: It`s our duty to find her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Missing.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: The witness seen the suspect on the NANCY GRACE show.

GRACE: There is a God.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: NANCY GRACE show was out there for us.

GRACE: Found alive, 50 people, 50 days, 50 nights. Let`s don`t give up.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Every day you think about it. Every time the phone rings or something, you think. There`s not a day goes by that you don`t think about it.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Nine-year-old Scott Allen Kleeschulte had a lot to celebrate. It was the last day of school, and the family planned on going out that night for a fun dinner. After school, Scott arrives home. He changes and heads out to play with friends. But suddenly, a powerful thunderstorm comes down, and Scott never makes it back home.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: … able to put his picture out yet, and that is just — that would be too hard, to just sit and you know, have to walk by and see it. All of my stuff was put away of his. I can`t handle that part of it.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Scott`s parents say Scott was afraid of storms and was very worried when he didn`t come home. Police immediately began searching the area for any sign of the 1st-grader. Bloodhounds reportedly tracked Scott`s scent from his home to a wooded area nearby, but no sign of the little boy.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Spread along there and just (INAUDIBLE) up the hill.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: It`s highly unusual to have someone just simply disappear from the face of the earth. And that`s why we still do hold out some hope. We would expect that there would be some article of clothing or some piece of evidence which would indicate that Scott drowned. But to date, nothing has been located.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: After focusing on a series of man-made caves in the wooded area, investigators have run out of leads. But Scott`s family has never given up hope.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Is he still out there? Or if he`s not, what did happen? We would like to have a closure one way or the other. Down deep, I think there is hope. I mean, you can`t give up. And I just got a gut feeling that something might come out of this.

GRACE: Every day, 2,300 people go missing in America, disappear, vanish. Families left behind waiting, wondering, hoping, but never forgetting. And neither have we — 50 people, 50 days, 50 nights we go live spotlighting America`s missing children, boys, girls, mothers, fathers, grandparents gone. But where?

Tonight, St. Charles, Missouri, June 1988, the last day of school. Nine-year-old Scott Kleeschulte looking forward to the summer. Scott, Mom, Dad, four brothers and sisters plan a big family dinner that night. After school, Scott comes home to change into play clothes, then walks over to a friend`s house. His sister sees her little brother standing on the top of a hill just yards away. Nine-year-old Scott Kleeschulte never seen again. Tonight, where is 9-year-old Scott? Straight out to you, Jean.

JEAN CASAREZ, GUEST HOST: And it was June 1998. And Scott played outside a lot. He did that all the time, especially after school. But that day, a ferocious thunderstorm came into the area. It was a June storm, and it was really violent, they say. It moved on. It wasn`t there for that long. But after that, Scott Kleeschulte was gone.

I want to go out to David Lohr, crime reporter for AOL.com. This was a very big day. He had just graduated from the 1st grade. The family was going to go out to dinner that night. But once that thunderstorm passed, they couldn`t find him. What happened, Scott? (SIC)

DAVID LOHR, AOLNEWS.COM: Well, Jean, it was June 8th, 1988. He went to school that day, got home about 3:30 in the afternoon, ran inside, changed into his play clothes and was going to go across the street to play with one of the neighborhood kids. Well, that kid was still eating dinner. He wasn`t ready to come outside yet. So Scott decided to play on his own. He went outside. The storm broke out around 4:30. And his sister left to go to work. She saw him playing outside on the hill up the street, and that was the last time anybody seen him.

GRACE: Joining us is David Lohr, crime reporter for AOL.com. To Ellie Jostad, “NANCY GRACE” producer. The family said that little Scott was always afraid of storms, so they thought that maybe he had hidden somewhere until the storm passed, right?

ELLIE JOSTAD, “NANCY GRACE” PRODUCER: That`s right. And they started getting concerned — Mom and Dad got home from work at about 5:15. The storm had since blown through, but he hadn`t returned home. She sent — the parents sent his brother, Richard, who`ll be joining us shortly — sent him out to look for his little brother. He started running around the neighborhood, checking out places that they played together, started asking other neighborhood kids where he might be, and they could find no sign of him.

CASAREZ: No sign at all. And joining us tonight, a very special guest. And we appreciate so much for him coming on with us, is Richard Kleeschulte. He is the brother, and he was very close with his brother, Scott. Richard, thank you very much, coming to us from St. Louis, Missouri, tonight. Tell us exactly where your family lived in Missouri at this time.

RICHARD KLEESCHULTE, BROTHER: In St. Charles, Missouri, probably 30 miles, I guess, outside of St. Louis.

CASAREZ: So very, very close to the big city. How did you find out that Scott had disappeared?

KLEESCHULTE: I mean, I lived in the house and he just didn`t come home. So I mean, it was kind of self-explanatory.

CASAREZ: So was it your last day of school also? You were in a different school, but your last day?

KLEESCHULTE: Yes. Yes. I got out probably about 30 minutes before he did.

CASAREZ: Did you see him at all at home before he went out to play?

KLEESCHULTE: No. I did not see him that day at all.

CASAREZ: Who was the last person to see him?

KLEESCHULTE: As far as I know, family and friends, would have been my older sister, Stacy (ph), before she left for work and stuff. She was there when he had come home and changed after school and that. So as far as I know, it was Stacy.

CASAREZ: And what did Stacy see?

KLEESCHULTE: He was — the last time she had seen him, he was at the top of the hill just playing, running around, being a kid like we did. You know, I know people say not to play in the streets, but that`s where we played, up at the top of the street. And that`s where he was.

CASAREZ: And this was a fairly urban but rural area, too. You were sort of out in the country, right, where kids just could feel free to play?

KLEESCHULTE: Yes. It was a neighborhood. I mean, it was a neighborhood full of 100 kids, probably, in the neighborhood, but you know, right five minutes from our house was nothing, farmlands and fields and dirt trails and stuff like that.

CASAREZ: How violent was that storm late afternoon? And did you think your brother had just hidden to have cover?

KLEESCHULTE: Yes. It was a pretty bad storm. You know, it just came and went pretty quick. You know, I don`t think he hid, necessarily, like, hid somewhere. We just assumed that he was inside someone`s house, you know, playing inside with another friend, you know, and that`s just kind of — then started knocking on doors, on every door we could.

CASAREZ: When did your parents finally call police?

KLEESCHULTE: It was later in the evening. I can`t — you know, I`m not for sure on the time, 8:00, somewhere around there. It was, you know, before it had gotten dark.

CASAREZ: And I understand they came right out.

KLEESCHULTE: Yes. Yes. They were there right away, yes.

CASAREZ: So what did they do that evening and the next day and the next few days and the next week?

KLEESCHULTE: That night, I`m not — you know, it`s pretty vague for me because I was young. So that night, you know, I can`t remember exactly what all, what they did. But that next morning was full-fledged. They had a search party set up with dogs and helicopters and horsebacks and you name it, you know, anything that you had back at that time, they were using.

CASAREZ: You know, Michael, you were the closest in age. You and your brother, Scott, were very close. What did this do to you at that time? You were only 12, and all of a sudden, your brother is gone off the face of the earth.

KLEESCHULTE: Yes. I mean, it`s — it`s life-changing. There`s no doubt about it. It just — it shook us all up. You know, he`s my best friend and I just miss him.

CASAREZ: And for all these years, the investigation has stayed active and we will go through everything they did. But I want to bring something up front right away. In 2007, a man was arrested. And suddenly, your family hears — that man`s name was Michael Devlin, and your family suddenly hears that two young boys were kidnapping victims that survived. And this was only 20 miles away from where you lived. I`m talking about 13-year-old Ben Ownby and Shawn Hornbeck what were both kidnapped by Michael Devlin. What impact did it have on your family to suddenly find out that two living kidnapping victims were found?

KLEESCHULTE: Well, first off, you know, it brings back a lot of the pain and the memories. You know, you start thinking about all that. But it also gives you hope. And you know, you`re also so happy for them families that find their missing sons. But you know, it gives you hope in a way that miracles do happen, and someone could have did that with my brother. And you know, the thing is, is they just never found him. So he could have just went on living the life with that guy and being raised, you know, hopefully, in a good home with someone, is what you think, I guess. You know, I mean, it just — it shocks you to the core.

CASAREZ: Richard, we are here tonight to help in that search for your brother. We want to show everybody a picture of your brother, Scott Kleeschulte. He was 9 years old when he went missing. That is a picture of what he looked like. Look at that picture. He had freckles across his nose. He had brown hair and blue eyes, a scar on his chin. At the time, he was wearing a Rude Dog (ph) T-shirt, khaki pants, red and black high-top sneakers.

And there`s a picture of age progression, what he would look like now. I want to go to Marc Klaas, president and founder of Klaas Kids Foundation. Marc, this case struck me the minute I studied it because of the location, very close to St. Louis, Missouri, very close to where Michael Devlin was arrested for kidnapping.

MARC KLAAS, KLAAS KIDS FOUNDATION: And he could very well be involved in this case, as well.

(COMMERCIAL BREAK)

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: I`ve never been able to put his picture out yet. And that is just — that would be too hard.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Scott Kleeschulte was 9 years old when he disappeared in St. Charles, Missouri, a St. Louis suburb.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Family says Scott was seen just at the top of this neighborhood hill by his sister, heading out to play. But then a storm strikes. A witness reportedly claims to see Scott after the rain starts, but nobody knows where the little 9-year-old ended up.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: It`s highly unusual to have someone just simply disappear from the face of the earth, and that`s why we still do hold out some hope.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Police launch a full-scale investigation, looking for the boy on ATVs, by air and by horseback, but Scott nowhere to be found.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Scott Kleeschulte`s family doesn`t even know what Scott looks like today, if this age progression image even comes close. But they refuse to give up looking for him.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

CASAREZ: I`m Jean Casarez. This adorable little boy got off the school bus, walked to his home, and he wanted to play. School was out for the summer, so he changed his clothes, he went outside, and that was the last that really anybody ever saw from him.

I want to go to David Lohr, crime reporter for AOL.com, joining us tonight. David, there have been at least a couple of sightings, it`s believed, at least early on that someone saw him before he went missing. What do we know?

LOHR: Yes. There was a couple sightings in various states. Law enforcement looked into them, but they`ve never — nothing`s ever came of any of it. A number of those sightings came in in the early `90s. Thy had taken the age-progressed photo. They put it on a bunch of advertising mailers and sent them out all over the United States, but nothing ever panned out. He was never identified.

CASAREZ: It was 50 million mailers that went out over the country. But Ellie Jostad, “NANCY GRACE” producer, what I`m thinking about — wasn`t there a sighting shortly before he went missing? Somebody in a vehicle believed they could have seen him playing close to the house?

JOSTAD: Right. There was a report that someone had seen him playing near these caves. Now, this is a series of caves that were carved out of this hillside. And this is something that local kids had made. These were al quite unsafe, this whole labyrinth of kids that — of caves that the kids would play in. And someone claimed that they saw him near there. They actually took those caves all apart, dug as deep as 40 feet into the hillside, and were never able to find any clues there.

CASAREZ: What about a scent dog, Ellie? Because this is interesting. Listen to this, everybody. Ellie?

JOSTAD: Right. Well, there was also a report, a man, a bloodhound handler said that his dog picked up Scott`s scent and actually traced it about a mile-and-a-half away to a construction site where an apartment building was being built. Again, they were never able to substantiate any sort of clues, never got any further than what that man says his dog picked up.

CASAREZ: And joining us tonight once again is the brother of Scott. Richard Kleeschulte is joining us tonight. You and your brother — I know you said that your brother was your shadow as you were growing up. He really looked up to you, didn`t he, Richard.

KLEESCHULTE: Yes, yes. Just like, I mean, I looked up to my older brother, he pretty much did the same thing.

CASAREZ: When investigators and police were just combing your area, they believed that he had gone to a certain creek or something, and you had to convince authorities that your brother didn`t like that creek, you didn`t go there?

KLEESCHULTE: Yes. At the beginning, there was — you know, with the flash flooding and all that that was going on, there was a lot of speculation that he might have drowned or something like that. And me and my parents and everyone else was pretty adamant against that just because he didn`t really like the water like that. And in the area that it was in, it was just not in a direction that we ever went to. So I`m fairly positive that that didn`t happen. He didn`t go that way.

CASAREZ: What do you think happened? Where did he — let me ask you, where did he get off the school bus every day in relation to your home?

KLEESCHULTE: Fifty feet, a hundred feet, just right at the top of the hill. And we`re the last house going to the top of the hill. So it was right there, is where he gets off the bus.

CASAREZ: Did police ever tell you that they scanned that area to see if vehicles — witnesses saw a vehicle at all watching the children get off the bus?

KLEESCHULTE: Yes. Not to my knowledge. You know, I`ve never heard anything like that and so — yes, nothing. I never heard of any vehicles or them even thinking maybe there was someone watching the kids getting off the bus or anything along them lines, no bus?

CASAREZ: You know, Richard, you have lived this along with your parents since 1988. What do you think really happened to Scott?

KLEESCHULTE: I think he was taken. I don`t — I really don`t believe he ever — not — no water. I don`t think he made it to the woods even because I was down there, and there was really only one way in and one way out that he would come. And he — I didn`t see him, and I came out that way before the storm had hit and we never crossed paths. So he never made it to the dirt trails even. So something happened on the road.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: When Scott Kleeschulte disappeared in June of 1988, friends, family and neighbors launched a massive search in the woods behind their St. Charles subdivision. Every clue, every lead from every part of the country has so far turned up nothing.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: (INAUDIBLE) is he still out there? Or if he`s not, what did happen? We would like to have a closure one way or the other.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Police have spent the last two decades searching for Scott, looking at every from rivers to man-made caves in a wooded area near Scott`s home, but no sign of the little boy.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

CASAREZ: This little boy, 9-year-old Scott Kleeschulte, he was on the junior football team. You see some pictures of him in his football uniform. And he was playing right behind his house. He was right there, and then he was gone. And this is in Missouri. It is about 20 miles from St. Louis County.

And I want to remind everybody, Michael Devlin, one of the modern kidnapping miracles of our time, along with Elizabeth Smart — Michael Devlin, now serving over 70 life terms, confessed to kidnapping Ben Ownby, who was 13 years old when he was kidnapped in January 2007, and confessed to Shawn Hornbeck, kidnapping him in 2002.

I want to go out to Sheryl McCollum, crime analyst and director of cold case squad, Pine Lake PD, and author of the book “Cold Case: Pathways to Justice” joining us from Atlanta. Late today, Sheryl, we spoke with the attorney for Michael Devlin, who actually confirmed with us that once Michael Devlin was convicted, that a polygraph was administered in regard to Scott, and he passed it, that he said he had nothing to do with the disappearance of little Scott Kleeschulte. Polygraphs, though, don`t always tell the truth.

SHERYL MCCOLLUM, CRIME ANALYST: Sometimes, yes. Here`s the deal with this case. There is no way, after Shawn and Ben are recovered, do you not say, We have to look at this guy for Scott — same age bracket, similar in the way they appear as, you know, little boys. Also, Devlin was in that area. As a 23-year-old guy, he hunted in the woods near Shawn`s (SIC) house. You have to look at that. There`s no way to ignore that.

And again, with the polygraph, I don`t know. Does he have a conscience or not? I don`t know. Has he ever failed one? I don`t know that, either. But I know there`s no way I wouldn`t look at it to see if I could link him to a lot of these missing young boys in that area.

CASAREZ: And Sheryl, let`s couple with that Michael Devlin only had two victims in his entire life?

MCCOLLUM: No way.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

GRACE: Vanished into thin air.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Look for her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: We just need to find her.

GRACE: So many cases.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: We`re still looking.

GRACE: So few leads.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Missing.

GRACE: Missing person.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: It`s our duty to find her.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Missing.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: The witness seen the suspect on Nancy Grace.

GRACE: There is a God.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Nancy Grace show was out there for us.

GRACE: Found. Alive. 50 people, 50 days, 50 nights. Let`s don`t give up.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Every day you think about it, every time the phone rings or something, you think. There`s not a day goes by that you don`t think about it.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Nine-year-old Scott Allen Kleeschulte had a lot to celebrate. It was the last day of school, and the family planned on going out that night for a fun dinner. After school, Scott arrives home. He changes and heads out to play with friends, but suddenly, a powerful thunderstorm comes down, and Scott never makes it back home.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Not able to put his picture out yet, it`s just – – that would be too hard to just sit and, you know, have to walk by and see it. All of my stuff is put away of his. I can`t handle that part of it.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Scott`s parents say Scott was afraid of storms and was very worried when he didn`t come home. Police immediately began searching the area for any sign of the first grader. Bloodhounds reportedly tracked Scott`s scent from his home to a wooded area nearby, but no sign of the little boy.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Spread out along there and just take up the hill.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: It`s highly unusual to have someone just simply disappear from the face of the earth, and that`s why we still do hold out some hope. We would expect that there would be some article of clothing or some piece of evidence which would indicate that Scott drowned, but to date, nothing has been located.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: After focusing on a series of manmade caves in the wooded area, investigators have run out of leads, but Scott`s family has never given up hope.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Is he still out there? Or if he`s not, what did happen? We would like to have a closure one way or the other. Down deep, I think there is hope. I mean, you can`t give up. And I just got a gut feeling that something might come out of this.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

GRACE: Every day 2,300 people go missing in America, disappear, vanished. Families left behind waiting, wondering, hoping, but never forgetting. And neither have we. Fifty people, 50 days, 50 nights we go live, spotlighting America`s missing children, boys, girls, mothers, fathers, grandparents gone, but where? >

Tonight, St. Charles, Missouri, June 1988, the last day of school, nine-year-old Scott Kleeschulte looking forward to the summer. Scott, mom, dad, four brothers and sisters plan a big family dinner that night. After school, Scott comes home to change into play clothes then walks over to a friend`s house. His sister sees her little brother standing on the top of the hill just yards away. Nine-year-old Scott Kleeschulte never seen again. Tonight, where is nine-year-old Scott? Straight out to you, Jean.

JEAN CASAREZ, LEGAL CORRESPONDENT, “IN SESSION”: It was June 8th, 1988, it was a big day. Scott had just passed from first grade into second grade. He was going to be a big second grader next year, and the whole family had planned a dinner that night because the kids were out of school for the summer. But then, it all changed because Scott was gone.

I want to go out to Pat Brown, criminal profiler, joining us tonight, author of “The Profiler,” joining us from Washington, D.C. Pat, somebody knows something, and people talk. People that do things can`t keep it held up inside. They tell others. So, somebody knows something, Pat. The time has come to come forward.

PAT BROWN, CRIMINAL PROFILER: Well, Jean, I`m not sure I agree with that. It`s surprising how many crimes do get committed, especially homicides, when you especially have a lone psychopath, a serial killer- type. He does what he wants to do. He gets rid of the body. He goes back home and has a hamburger and never does tell anybody. So, often, nobody really does know. But I will say this.

Sometimes, if people can go back, if the police can go back, and we can go back and give very good details like we are tonight, somebody may not know what happened to Scott or not know necessarily that they know the person who did it, but they may remember things about that, you know, say, well, you know, my cousin, Ernie, he was acting strange that night or my cousin Ernie did this and he lived that area, and later on, he got caught for some other kinds of the crimes.

So, they might be able to bring that kind of memory. And I just want to say one other thing. Whenever we have children go outside, we often worry about our girls, you know, our nine-year-old, 10-year-old, 12-year- old girls. We worry about them, but it`s funny, when we think about our boys going out, riding bicycles around and playing at the park, we often don`t think they can become victim of a predator like this, but it does happen. We see it right here.

CASAREZ: That is a good point. To Richard Kleeschulte, joining us tonight who is the brother of Scott, who`s been kind enough to step forward. I know this is difficult. I know it`s tough to rehash this, but Richard, your parents have been through so much since 1988. How are they doing?

RICHARD KLEESCHULTE, BROTHER OF MISSING BOY, SCOTT ALLEN KLEESCHULTE: They`re doing good. Mom`s a rock. She holds us all together. Dad, dad`s had a little bit of health problems here lately in the last few years, but I mean, his brain and his mind is there, and they`re doing good. I mean, talk about it a lot, and never forget him. Never. Every day, I think about him.

CASAREZ: When was the last time police have contacted you? And have they told you what, if anything, they`re doing on this case?

KLEESCHULTE: You know, they contact mom every once in a while. Not for, say, the police department, itself, but the detective that worked the case would constantly get ahold of mom. You know, nothing new has come up for a while, so, you know, not much has been said. Not pretty much since the Devlin stuff. You know, it got pretty hectic around that time, but it`s been pretty calm now for a while.

CASAREZ: We want everybody to look at this picture. Scott Kleeschulte. Nine years old when he disappeared. Look at him. The way he was when he disappeared. Look at the age-progression photograph. To Bethany Marshall, psychoanalyst and author of “Deal Breakers,” joining us tonight from Los Angeles. The pain that this family has had to endure as Richard just said, it is life changing. How do they continue to cope while the questions are still there with no answers?

BETHANY MARSHALL, PSYCHOANALYST: Well, it`s difficult because the ambiguity makes you think the worst. At least, if they knew something concrete, like, that he was for sure deceased, then they could begin a normal grieving process. I want to really add to what the panel is saying for a moment. Pat Brown made a very good point about protecting our boys. We know that male pedophiles who offend, who are preferentially attracted to little boys and who are extra familial molesters, meaning they molest outside the family, they are the most prolific sex offenders in our society.

According to some research, they offend over 500 times over the course of their lifetime. Their compulsion is so strong, and the longer they live, of course, the more they offend. The compulsion does not wane over the course of a lifetime. So, of course, Michael Devlin did not just have two victims. Oh, and by the way, they start molesting at the age of 13. That`s the average age that they start picking on smaller children in the community. So, I would look at groups of online pedophiles who share pornography with each other.

I would look — I would ask the little boys in the community about older men who have been bothering them. I would look at the prison population. We know the sex offenders offend for over ten years, normally, before they`re caught. So, that`s where they`re going to harvest the richest information in terms of trying to figure out what happens.

CASAREZ: Good words, Bethany.

And tonight, please help us find J.J. Willman. He`s 19 years old. He vanished on November 27th, 2010. That`s just a couple months ago. From Woodson Terrace, Missouri. He`s 5`10″, 130 pounds with dirty blond hair and blue eyes. There`s a $5,000 reward. If you have any information, please, call 314-427-5858.

If your loved one is missing and you need help, go to CNN.com/nancygrace and send us your story. We want to help you find your loved ones.

(BEGIN VIDEO CLIP)

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: On June 8th, 1988, nine-year-old Scott Kleeschulte was playing in the neighborhood near his home in St. Charles, Missouri, shortly before a wild thunderstorm had swept the area. Scott`s parents say Scott was afraid of storms and was very worried when he didn`t come home.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Scott`s disappearance spurred an immediate investigation, detectives using search dogs and digging equipment to excavate a series of tunnels and caves that had been used for play by neighborhood children.

UNIDENTIFIED FEMALE: Investigators including the FBI continue to look for leads, even looking into whether convicted child predator, Michael Devlin, who is serving a life sentence for kidnapping then 12-year-old Shawn Hornbeck and 13-year-old Ben Ownby is connected to the case. Investigators reportedly determine Devlin hunted in the wooded area near Scott`s home around the time of Scott`s disappearance but have found no official link as of yet.

(END VIDEO CLIP)

CASAREZ: Let`s go out to Marc Klaas, president and founder of Klaaskids Foundation joining us from San Francisco. Marc, what do you think?

MARC KLAAS, PRESIDENT & FOUNDE, KLAASKIDS FOUNDATION: Well, I agree with almost everything that`s been said tonight. Pardon me. If it wasn`t Devlin, then it was most likely another predator that took this little boy. I think two things that really hindered the investigation that wouldn`t occur now is the fact that there were no protocols for searching for missing children back in the 1980s.

And Missouri did not have a sex offender registry, so you couldn`t even round up the usual suspects at that time. That having been said, there was a task force convened not long ago to look into the possibility of Devlin being involved in this case as well as many others, and I believe that it was disbanded, and their findings were inconclusive on all counts.

CASAREZ: Right. I think you are right. Let`s go out to the callers. Gale in Virginia. Hi, Gale.

GALE, VIRGINIA: Hi, Miss Jean, how are you?

CASAREZ: I`m fine. Thank you for calling.

GALE: You`re welcome. I have a question. The man, I can`t think of his name, I`m sorry, Polly Klaas` father. He just answered the question. Back then, they did not have amber alerts. And because you have a son instead of a daughter, you need to keep an eye on your children at this day and time, because I live in a small town of 6,000 people in Virginia.

Within a six-block radius, we have 20 pedophiles and three of them are women, but they do not ever notify anybody that you have one living around you. I get on the computer every night to see who is around me, and you know, that`s the only way. I mean, I thought the laws were when one moved in the neighborhood, they were to tell the neighborhood that one lived there. I mean, what do you do?

CASAREZ: Well, you know, Gail, you make a really good point. And I think what I have learned from doing this series, that I believe in so very much is, it is so easy to go missing. And I don`t care what age you are, but that is the reality. Thanks for calling, Gail. Patricia in New York. Hi, Patricia.

PATRICIA, NEW YORK: Hi there.

CASAREZ: Thank you for calling.

PATRICIA: My question is, have they gone back and re-interviewed the boy`s friends now that they are older?

CASAREZ: That`s a really good question. To Sheryl McCollum, crime analyst. Give us some examples of what law enforcement can do now as far as re-interviewing or going in different directions.

SHERYL MCCOLLUM, CRIME ANALYST: Absolutely. You`re going to re- interview the friends. You know, at nine and 10 years old, you may be scared to tell people we went into this cave or into this pipe, you know? So, you know, you re-interview them as grown men, and they maybe tell you, you know, yes, he had this guy that he would meet sometimes, and this guy was going to go hunting over here or he got in the car with this guy to go to the ball field. Absolutely re-interview.

But I`m going to tell you, you stay on Devlin. You stay on him. You talk to any cellmate, you talk to anybody else he may have contact with, because don`t forget, Jean, he was going to kill Shawn Hornbeck, and Shawn talked him out of it. And when does he go get Ben? When Shawn`s too old. He`s out of his, you know, age range of preference. And this guy made porn with Shawn. So, this guy we know is a potential killer. He was going to kill Shawn with his bare hands.

CASAREZ: You`re exactly right. Shawn Hornbeck saved his own life by telling Devlin he would do whatever Devlin wanted at any time so he could live. But Sheryl, what`s the motive for Devlin to come clean right now?

MCCOLLUM: Oh, he doesn`t have to have a motive. We don`t need him to have a motive. We don`t ever need a motive. What we need to do is investigate this like he`s the only viable suspect we have right now because he`s it. And yes, there could be others, but right now, he`s got the most link, the most connection. I mean, he`s in the area. He`s known to do it. I mean, he`s the guy right this minute. He`s the number one guy right this minute.

And if he wants to come forward, it would be just because he wants to do it, but I guarantee you, there`s something either in his cell, there`s something in his past that will show a better linkage here. You know, he had a job one other time at a tool factory, another time at a, you know, funeral home. Did he ever work in that area? Was he working construction owned that apartment complex? Go back and find out.

CASAREZ: He was doing alarm work at the time, and made a call into that county for a job. We do know that. Pat brown, what are your thoughts about this? I mean, the way I look at it, he`s serving 70 years, so why should he give up anymore victims? I mean, goodness of heart on his part?

BROWN: That`s not going to happen. The biggest problem with this is that he got nailed for kidnapping. He`s not going to pipe up and say, by the way, I murdered somebody, too, because that`s obviously worse. And, you know, if it was Devlin, then clearly, this poor child was murdered because he`s not around with him. And here`s another thing that happened, sometimes.

On the way to being able to hold those children, you know, to keep them for years and have that kind of control over them, the earlier crimes may be homicides because they don`t have that ability yet, so they`re grabbing the child and keeping them for a small period of time and then getting rid of them. So, it is very possible Devlin was involved, but he has got absolutely zero incentive to give any information.

CASAREZ: Right. Once again, his attorney has told us that he had nothing to do with the disappearance of Scott Kleeschulte. To Trina in Washington. Hi, Trina.

TRINA, WASHINGTON: Hi.

CASAREZ: Thank you for calling. What`s your question?

TRINA: Yes. My question is, was there any evidence ever found with Devlin that he was linked to any kind of child pedophilia ring or child porn ring or was he acting alone?

CASAREZ: To Ellie Jostad, Nancy Grace producer, what`s a little bit of the background of Michael Devlin?

ELLIE JOSTAD, NANCY GRACE PRODUCER: Well, Michael Devlin, as you explained, he is now serving 74 consecutive life sentences as well as 170 years on federal charges. But he was a guy who worked at a pizza parlor, and as you explained, he kidnapped Shawn Hornbeck as he was out riding his bike. Four years later, kidnapped Ben Ownby, a boy scout, as he was getting off the school bus.

Both of those crimes were in the suburban to where (ph) St. Louis area. That`s why they were looking at him in the Kleeschulte case as well as in the case of Arlon Henderson (ph), both of those boys abducted in very similar circumstances.

CASAREZ: That`s right. And they did find a lot of child porn on his computer, correct, Ellie?

JOSTAD: That`s right.

CASAREZ: And even had, I think, Shawn Hornbeck, as we said, participate in that?

JOSTAD: That`s our understanding.

CASAREZ: Right. So, obviously, had a life-long desire in that area. To Janet in Florida. Hi, Janet.

JANET, FLORIDA: Hi, Jean.

CASAREZ: Thank you for calling.

JANET: Sure. I`m delighted to have the opportunity to tell you I love when you fill in for Nancy.

CASAREZ: Oh, you`re kind. Thank you. Your question?

JANET: Yes. It`s just one nagging question here. It`s very curious to me as to whether Scott went out — when he went out to play, was he alone, or was he not with any other children?

CASAREZ: Well, that`s an interesting question. I don`t think we`ve gotten to that. To Richard Kleeschulte, the brother of Scott who is joining us tonight. Scott actually wanted to play with a little neighbor, right, Richard? And he went over to his house? Tell us that story.

KLEESCHULTE: Yes. After he came home, he changed and probably grabbed him a quick snack and ran across the street to my buddy, Mike`s house, which was my best friend, and, you know, Scott being Scott followed us everywhere. So, he went over there, and Mike was inside eating some ice cream and told him he`d be out in a little bit. And by the time he went out there, you know, never found him or met up with him.

GRACE: These are the faces of America`s missing. Every 30 seconds, another child, sister, brother, father, mother, disappears. Families left behind wondering, waiting, hoping. We have not forgotten.

(BEGIN VIDEOTAPE)

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: John Glasgow of Little Rock, Arkansas, did not show up to work one day just over two years ago. Later, his Volvo was found along with his cell phone, laptop, and office key inside.

Samantha Kibalo was an infant when her mother allegedly disappeared with her during a scheduled visitation. Samantha`s father is still searching for the girl who is now 12.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Samantha`s been missing now ten years, and I have not seen or heard or have any connection or contact with her. My wife and I split up two weeks after Samantha was born. She told me that she did not need a man in her life anymore. That`s all she wanted was a baby. Samantha was very lively, energetic, friendly, theatrical.

She loved to put on hats and play dress-up. Jump around. Try to sing and dance. Very outgoing. Very happy child. I would say to Samantha that daddy is alive. Daddy loves you. Every day as I wake up is one day closer to having Samantha back home and in my arms.

UNIDENTIFIED MALE: Rochelle Battle was last seen in Baltimore, Maryland, wearing a brown hooded sweatshirt, blue jeans, and brown boots.

Just over a year ago, Nataly Aguiar disappeared and may be in the company of her mother. They were last seen in North Carolina.

(END VIDEOTAPE)

GRACE: I`m Nancy Grace. See you tomorrow night, 9 o`clock sharp eastern. And until then, we will be looking. Keep the faith, friend.

END 

http://transcripts.cnn.com/TRANSCRIPTS/1102/10/ng.01.html

 

 

 

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